Shareable Infographic: Top 5 Mental Health Benefits Of Pets | HABRI

May is Mental Health Month. According to HABRI’s survey of pet owners, the majority of pet owners have personal experience with the health benefits of pets:

  • 74% of pet owners reported mental health improvements from pet ownership
  • 75% of pet owners reported a friend’s or family member’s mental health has improved from pet ownership

The scientific research that supports the human-animal bond – or the mutually beneficial relationship between people and pets – for better mental health indicates that pets can make a difference for those facing mental health concerns, including anxiety, depression, loneliness and stress.

HABRI, in partnership with Mental Health America, has created this new infographic highlighting the mental health benefits of a healthy relationship with a pet.

HABRI hopes that in sharing this far and wide throughout Mental Health Month, we can encourage people to take care of their pets and remind them that in good times and in bad, our companion animals can be wonderful sources of support and relief from mental health conditions.

Please consider posting this infographic on your social media channels, websites and with your colleagues, friends and family to help us strengthen the human-animal bond for all!

References

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  2. Brooks, H., Rushton, K., Walker, S., Lovell, K., & Rogers, A. (2016). Ontological security and connectivity provided by pets: a study in the self-management of the everyday lives of people diagnosed with a long-term mental health condition. BMC psychiatry16(1), 409.
  3. Valeri, R. M. (2006). Tails of laughter: A pilot study examining the relationship between companion animal guardianship (pet ownership) and laughter. Society & Animals14(3), 275-293.
  4. HABRI, Social Isolation & Loneliness
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  12. Brooks, H., Rushton, K., Walker, S., Lovell, K., & Rogers, A. (2016). Ontological security and connectivity provided by pets: a study in the self-management of the everyday lives of people diagnosed with a long-term mental health condition. BMC psychiatry16(1), 409.
  13. Beetz, A., Uvnäs-Moberg, K., Julius, H., & Kotrschal, K. (2012). Psychosocial and psychophysiological effects of human-animal interactions: the possible role of oxytocin. Frontiers in psychology3, 234.
  14. Miller, S. C., Kennedy, C. C., DeVoe, D. C., Hickey, M., Nelson, T., & Kogan, L. (2009). An examination of changes in oxytocin levels in men and women before and after interaction with a bonded dog. Anthrozoös22(1), 31-42.
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  16. Odendaal, J. S., & Meintjes, R. A. (2003). Neurophysiological correlates of affiliative behaviour between humans and dogs. The Veterinary Journal165(3), 296-301.
  17. Pop, D. A., Rusu, A. S., Pop-Vancea, V., Papuc, I., Constantinescu, R., & Miresan, V. (2014). Physiological effects of human-animal positive interaction in dogs-review of the literature. Bulletin of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca. Animal Science and Biotechnologies71(2), 102-110.
  18. Nagasawa, M., Mitsui, S., En, S., Ohtani, N., Ohta, M., Sakuma, Y., … & Kikusui, T. (2015). Oxytocin-gaze positive loop and the coevolution of human-dog bonds. Science348(6232), 333-336.
  19. Vitale, K. R., Behnke, A. C., & Udell, M. A. (2019). Attachment bonds between domestic cats and humans. Current Biology29(18), R864-R865.
  20. Shreve, K. R. V., Mehrkam, L. R., & Udell, M. A. (2017). Social interaction, food, scent or toys? A formal assessment of domestic pet and shelter cat (Felis silvestris catus) preferences. Behavioural Processes141, 322-328.
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