Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) Grants to Address Important Areas of Scientific Research | HABRI

Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) Grants to Address Important Areas of Scientific Research

Washington, D.C. (December 21, 2020) — The Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) today announced the initiation of five new research projects focused on the positive effects of human-animal interaction on human health. These new scientific studies will focus on important areas of human-animal interaction research, including child health, healthy aging, cardiovascular health, and chronic disease management.  

This new group of projects will provide further evidence for the health benefits of the human-animal bond,” said Steven Feldman, president of HABRI. “For example, HABRI is funding the first study to examine the role of pet ownership on gut microbiota and risk of cardiovascular disease. 

The following five research projects were awarded HABRI funding: 

The CANINE III study will focus on the efficacy and impact of therapy animal interaction, and was made possible through Pet Partners, which continues to commit special funding for research into the health benefits of animal-assisted therapy. 

This robust pipeline of innovative research is made possible through the support leading pet care companies and organizations who are committed to strengthening the human-animal bond,” added Feldman. 

Since 2014, HABRI has funded 35 research projects from institutions across the globe, and has supported the creation of the world’s most comprehensive online library of human-animal interaction research. The 2021 HABRI Call for Research Proposals is now open. Please visit http://www.habri.org/funding-opportunities to learn more.  

About HABRI

HABRI is a not-for-profit organization that maintains the world’s largest online library of human-animal bond research and information; funds innovative research projects to scientifically document the health benefits of companion animals; and informs the public about human-animal bond research and the beneficial role of companion animals in society. For more information, please visit www.habri.org.   

Contact

Jamie Baxter

jamie@theimpetusagency.com

775.322.4022

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