Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) Shareable Infographic: 5 Ways the Human-Animal Bond is Improving Lives During the Pandemic | HABRI

Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) Shareable Infographic: 5 Ways the Human-Animal Bond is Improving Lives During the Pandemic

Washington, D.C. (November 23, 2020) — In recognition of how pets are helping us during the pandemic and just in time for the Thanksgiving holiday, the Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) has created a new shareable infographic, “5 Ways the Human-Animal Bond is Improving Lives During the Pandemic”. The infographic highlights research showing the positive role of pets in providing companionship and relief from stress, anxiety and loneliness.

“This is the time of year when many of us reflect on all of the things for which we are thankful. For pet owners, the human-animal bond is high on that list,” said HABRI Executive Director Steven Feldman, “HABRI’s goal is to raise awareness of the important role of human-animal bond, especially during difficult times.”

This infographic is part of an ongoing series to share human-animal bond research. In October, HABRI released the “Top 5 Health Benefits of Cat Ownership” infographic. In June, HABRI shared “Can Pets Help You Live Longer?“.

About HABRI

HABRI is a not-for-profit organization that maintains the world’s largest online library of human-animal bond research and information; funds innovative research projects to scientifically document the health benefits of companion animals; and informs the public about human-animal bond research and the beneficial role of companion animals in society. For more information, please visit https://habri.org/.

Contact

Jamie Baxter

jamie@theimpetusagency.com

775.322.4022

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