Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) and LifeLearn Animal Health Team up to Create Shareable Content for Veterinarians: The Human-Animal Bond Kit | HABRI

Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) and LifeLearn Animal Health Team up to Create Shareable Content for Veterinarians: The Human-Animal Bond Kit

Washington, D.C. (June 11, 2020) — In recognition of Pet Appreciation Week, the Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI), in partnership with LifeLearn Animal Health, have created a new, shareable human-animal bond kit, highlighting the health benefits of a healthy relationship with a pet.

The scientific research that supports the human-animal bond – or the mutually beneficial relationship between people and pets – for better health indicates that pets can make a difference in promoting physical activity, facilitating social connectedness, healthy aging and more.

According to HABRI’s survey of pet ownersi, knowledge of the human-animal bond improves pet care and welfare. When educated on the scientific research on the health benefits of pets:

  • 92% of pet owners are more likely to maintain their pet’s health, including keeping up with vaccines and preventative medicine
  • 89% of pet owners are more likely to take their pet to the vet for regular check-ups

HABRI and LifeLearn are proud to work together in creating shareable content for veterinarians and animal health professionals. The more we can remind people that in good times and bad, our companion animals are wonderful sources of support, comfort and joy, the healthier and happier we will be, together.

About LifeLearn Animal Health

LifeLearn Animal Health provides customizable online software solutions for veterinary practices to improve efficiency, save time, increase appointments, adapt, and thrive in a competitive new veterinary landscape. Animal health corporations also rely on LifeLearn to provide custom digital education, marketing, and communications products and services to help them market to their valued veterinary and pet-owner customers. For more information, please visit http://lifelearn.com.

About HABRI

HABRI is a not-for-profit organization that maintains the world’s largest online library of human-animal bond research and information; funds innovative research projects to scientifically document the health benefits of companion animals; and informs the public about human-animal bond research and the beneficial role of companion animals in society. For more information, please visit http://www.habri.org.

Contact

Jamie Baxter

jamie@theimpetusagency.com

775.322.4022

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LifeLearn Animal Health Supports Human-Animal Bond Research

The Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) announced today that LifeLearn Animal Health has become an official supporter of HABRI and its research on the mutually beneficial health benefits of companion animals. “LifeLearn is proud to become a HABRI supporter,” said Randy Valpy, President and CEO of LifeLearn. “The bond between people and their pets has been shown to influence the care that pet owners provide for their pets. So, supporting HABRI aligns with LifeLearn’s core commitment to advance animal health and education worldwide.” “LifeLearn is a leader in delivering innovative, trusted, and expert-vetted education resources for both veterinary teams and pet owners, which is what makes them such a good fit for a HABRI partnership,” said Steven Feldman, HABRI Executive Director. “LifeLearn can spread the word to key audiences about the strong connection between human and animal health.” HABRI research shows that when pet owners are educated about scientific research on the health benefits of pets, 92% say they are more likely to maintain their pet’s health, including keeping up with vaccines and preventative medicine. Additionally, 88% of pet owners are more likely to provide their pet with quality nutrition and 66% are less likely to skip visits to the veterinarian’s office when educated on the science behind the health benefits of pet ownership. “By creating education platforms that make it easier for people to communicate within the animal health profession, LifeLearn is making an important contribution towards strengthening bonds and improving lives on both ends of the leash,” Feldman added. About LifeLearn Animal Health Celebrating 25 years of continuing innovation and excellence, LifeLearn Inc. provides education and communications products and services to the veterinary profession, animal health organizations, and pet service businesses. LifeLearn’s award-winning competencies in digital media, combined with longstanding veterinary...

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School of Public Health Researchers Awarded Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) Grant

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