Nature’s Variety Supports Human-Animal Bond Research | HABRI

Nature’s Variety Supports Human-Animal Bond Research

Washington, D.C. (May 7, 2018) — The Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) announced today that Nature’s Variety®, makers of natural, wholesome and delicious pet food has become an official supporter of HABRI and its research into the health benefits of the human-animal bond.

“At Nature’s Variety, we believe in the power of pure, real nutrition to keep beloved pets healthy and happy. The human-animal bond is so central to our mission to give pets everything they need for a long and happy life with us,” said Reed Howlett, CEO of Nature’s Variety. “Supporting research into the human health benefits of pets is a perfect complement to our mission. We support better health for people and pets together.”

Scientific evidence increasingly shows that pets improve heart health; alleviate depression; increase well-being; support child health and development; and contribute to healthy aging. In addition, companion animals can assist in the treatment of a broad range of conditions from post-traumatic stress to Alzheimer’s disease to autism spectrum disorder.

The benefits of the human-animal bond impact more than just human health. Findings from a recent HABRI survey of 2,000 pet owners demonstrate that knowledge of the scientific research on the human-animal bond motivates pet owners to take better care of their pets. Specifically, when educated about the scientific research on the health benefits of pets, 88% of pet owners are more likely to provide their pets with high quality nutrition.

“HABRI is thrilled to add Nature’s Variety as a HABRI supporter,” said Steven Feldman, Executive Director of HABRI. “By joining forces with HABRI, Nature’s Variety is demonstrating its leadership in the pet care community!”

“From HABRI research, we know that healthy pets transform the lives of people through the human-animal bond – and Nature’s Variety transforms the lives of pets by empowering pet owners to provide their pets with natural nutrition,” added Howlett. “While HABRI does its part to fund research that explores new ways companion animals help those in need, Nature’s Variety will continue to unlock the potential of pets to thrive with better nutrition.”

About Nature’s Variety

Nature’s Variety is an independent company producing premium, natural pet foods, with headquarters in St. Louis and manufacturing operations in Lincoln, Nebraska. Nature’s Variety produces pet food through two brands – Instinct® The Raw Brand®, the leader in raw pet food; and Prairie®, a balanced holistic line of food. The Instinct® brand includes Instinct® Raw Boost®, Instinct® Raw Boost Mixers®, Instinct® Limited Ingredient Diets, Instinct® Healthy Weight, Instinct® Ultimate Protein®, and Pride by Instinct®. Nature’s Variety products are sold at local pet specialty retailers, Petco, PetSmart, veterinarian offices, and through online retailers, including Amazon and Chewy.com. For more information about Nature’s Variety, visit www.naturesvariety.com. For more information on Instinct®, visit www.instinctpetfood.com.

About The Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI)

The Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) is a not-for-profit organization that maintains the world’s largest online library of human-animal bond research and information; funds innovative research projects to scientifically document the health benefits of companion animals; and informs the public about human-animal bond research and the beneficial role of companion animals in society. For more information about the HABRI Foundation, please visit www.habri.org.

Contact

Jamie Baxter

jamie@theimpetusagency.com

775.322.4022

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