New Study to Examine Wellness Effects of Animals on Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder | HABRI

New Study to Examine Wellness Effects of Animals on Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Human Animal Bond Research Initiative Awards Grant to University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Human Animal Bond Research Initiative Awards Grant to University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Washington, D.C. (August 4, 2015) — The Human Animal Bond Research Initiative (HABRI) today announced it has awarded a $40,000 grant to the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus for a study titled Physiological Wellness Effects of Animal-Assisted Activities in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in a Specialized Psychiatric Hospital Program.

This study will examine the influence of animal-assisted activities on the mental health and wellness of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It is hypothesized that children will demonstrate lower physiological arousal when in the presence of dogs.

“Anecdotal reports of animal-assisted activities have observed such benefits as decreased anxiety-related behaviors as well as increases in social interactions, language, and safety awareness [in children with ASD],” said Dr. Robin Gabriels, PsyD, Principal Investigator and Associate Professor at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. “But we are in need of more research on how canines specifically, can be helpful to this population. It is our hope that our pilot project will provide preliminary evidence to validate the observed benefits and increase understanding of the mechanisms underlying this positive effect.”

The two-year crossover study will examine participants during a standard 20-minute social skills group, with 10 minutes of free interaction in the presence of a dog and 10 minutes in the presence of engaging toys. Using specialized wristbands to measure physiological arousal, researchers will compare the levels conducted within the two sessions.

“With high-quality scientific research, HABRI can make animal-assisted therapy a valuable addition to the treatments available for people with autism spectrum disorder,” said Steven Feldman, Executive Director of HABRI. “There is a growing body of scientific evidence that companion animals are important to human health. This research will ultimately help bring the healing power of the human-animal bond to more people who need it.”

About HABRI

The HABRI Foundation maintains the world’s largest online library of human-animal bond research and information; to date has funded more than half a million dollars in innovative research projects to scientifically document the health benefits of companion animals; and informs the public about human-animal bond research and the beneficial role of companion animals in society. For more information about the HABRI Foundation, visit http://www.habri.org.

About the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus combines state-of-the-art teaching, research and clinical facilities to prepare the region’s future health care professionals and help fuel its economy. CU Anschutz is the only comprehensive academic health sciences center in the state, with schools of medicine, pharmacy, dental medicine and public health, a college of nursing and a graduate school.

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