Virtual Lecture: The Importance of the Human-Animal Bond for Veterinarians | HABRI

Virtual Lecture: The Importance of the Human-Animal Bond for Veterinarians

IDEXX Human-Animal Bond Lecture Series Continues in 2022

Washington, D.C. (February 10, 2022) — The Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) and IDEXX, a global leader in pet healthcare innovation, today hosted a lecture with Dr. Jason Johnson, Vice President and Global Chief Medical Officer at IDEXX, and Steven Feldman, HABRI President, discussing compelling data on the importance of veterinarians as trusted resources for pet owners on the science of the human-animal bond.

“IDEXX is incredibly proud of our support for HABRI, its scientific research exploring the health benefits of the human-animal bond, and our partnership on this lecture series,” said Dr. Jason Johnson, VP and Global Chief Medical Officer at IDEXX. “By sharing how the human-animal bond is strengthening and how important it is to the health and well-being of people and their pets, we believe we can make a meaningful difference for the veterinary profession.”

The Human-Animal Bond Lecture Series was created to connect animal health professionals and pet owners with the science of the human-animal bond in a free and easy-to-use virtual format. Upcoming lectures in 2022 will feature academic researchers introducing new scientific studies investigating the health benefits of human-animal interaction (HAI), from child health to healthy aging. Lectures will also focus on providing veterinary teams with the tools they need to engage with their clients on these topics, which has been shown to improve compliance and care.

“With awareness of human-animal bond science higher than ever before, we want to equip veterinarians to be at the center of these conversations,” said HABRI President Steven Feldman. “HABRI is grateful for the continued support and leadership of IDEXX. Together, we are looking forward to bringing the science of the human-animal bond to a wider audience of animal health professionals and pet owners.”

Animal health professionals who view these sessions live will be eligible to receive RACE-approved Continuing Education (CE) credit through the American Association of Veterinary State Boards (AAVSB). Lectures will remain available on-demand at http://www.habri.org/HAB-Lectures.

About HABRI

HABRI is a not-for-profit organization that maintains the world’s largest online library of human-animal bond research and information; funds innovative research projects to scientifically document the health benefits of companion animals; and informs the public about human-animal bond research and the beneficial role of companion animals in society. For more information, please visit https://www.habri.org/.

About IDEXX

IDEXX Laboratories, Inc. is a member of the S&P 500® Index and is a leader in pet healthcare innovation, offering diagnostic and software products and services that deliver solutions and insights to practicing veterinarians around the world. IDEXX products enhance the ability of veterinarians to provide advanced medical care, improve staff efficiency and build more economically successful and effective practices. IDEXX is also a worldwide leader in providing diagnostic tests and information for livestock and poultry and tests for the quality and safety of water and milk and point-of-care and laboratory diagnostics for human medicine. Headquartered in Maine, IDEXX employs over 10,000 people and offers products to customers in over 175 countries. For more information about IDEXX, please visit: www.idexx.com.

Contact

Jamie Baxter

jamie@theimpetusagency.com

775.322.4022

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