Easing Restrictions on Pets in Rental Housing Could Help 8.75 Million Pets Find Homes Over Time | HABRI

Easing Restrictions on Pets in Rental Housing Could Help 8.75 Million Pets Find Homes Over Time

Groundbreaking Survey Data from Michelson Found Animals Foundation and Human Animal Bond Research Institute’s New Pet-Inclusive Housing Initiative Uncovers Hurdles for Renters, Opportunities for Property Owners

Washington, D.C. (January 28, 2020) — Non-profit organizations Michelson Found Animals Foundation and the Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) today announced the launch of the Pet-Inclusive Housing Initiative, a research and resource development initiative that promotes access to the joy of pets in every home. As part of the initial phase, the organizations today released the results of the most comprehensive survey research to-date on pets and rental housing in the United States.

The research shows that, while the majority of rental housing allows pets, significant restrictions present hurdles for pet-owning renters. The research also shows that there are major opportunities for property owners and operators who can ease such restrictions.

“Michelson Found Animals and HABRI had a clear goal with this research: to provide actionable insights that can help make it easier for renters to have pets in their lives,” said Aimee Gilbreath, executive director, Michelson Found Animals. “More pet-inclusive rentals could lead to millions more adoptions for renters who want pets.”

Steven Feldman, HABRI executive director, added: “The health and wellness benefits of pet ownership are well documented. Both renters and property managers understand how great pets are, and when restrictions are lifted, everyone can enjoy the full benefits of the human-animal bond.”

One third of pet owners in restricted pet-friendly housing said they would get another pet if restrictions were lifted, and 35% of non-pet-owners in non-pet-friendly housing would get a pet if restrictions were lifted. With changes that would allow more pets to be accommodated, as many as 8.75 million animals could find new homes over time.

 

  • 24% of renters with pets said that “my pet has been a reason for me needing to move,” which means as many as 6 million people have experienced a move related to pet ownership at some point in their lives.
  • 83% of property managers say that pet-friendly vacancies can be filled faster.
  • 79% of property managers say that pet-friendly vacancies are easier to fill.
  • Residents in pet-friendly units stay longer, averaging 4.6 years vs. 3.8 years for non-pet-friendly units.

 

“Pets are good for business. This data shows there are real opportunities for property owners and operators to achieve higher levels of occupancy and retention,” Feldman added. “With the Pet-Inclusive Housing Initiative, we hope to bring housing providers and the pet care community together, so that everyone can learn and benefit from this new data.”

 

ADDITIONAL KEY FINDINGS

Most Rental Housing is Pet-Friendly, with a variety of Requirements

  • 76% of rental units are identified by owner/operators as pet friendly
  • 72% restrict the number of pets
  • 77% allow dogs
    • 50% restrict the size of the dog, and the average weight limit is 45 lbs.
    • 50% restrict the breed of the dog
  • 64% allow cats
  • 51% of pet owners were required to take formal steps to have their pet approved, including signing addendums/additional contracts, providing health records/training certificates, and showing proof of pet insurance

Both Renters and Property Owners/Managers Believe Pets Are Good for Communities.

  • 93% of property managers believe that pets are important members of the family
  • 86% of property managers say they have a positive relationship with most renters with pets
  • 81% of property managers say they would work with renters if they discovered they had an unapproved pet
  • 71% of all renters (including those without pets) agree that pets bring people together within a community
  • 92% of all renters (including those without pets) agree that pets are important members of the family
  • 66% of all renter pet-owners say that their pets have brought them closer to their neighbors


“Pets bring us all together, so we know that we can use this research as the basis for a positive dialogue to increase the availability of pet-friendly rental housing to everyone’s benefit. So stay tuned,” added Gilbreath.

 

For more information go to petsandhousing.org.

About the Market Research

The market research, conducted by data and analytics consultancy LRW on behalf of Michelson Found Animals Foundation and HABRI, was conducted in the United States to explore the current housing circumstances of renters with and without pets in non-rural settings, and the perceptions of property owners and managers towards pet-friendly housing and pet owners. The research was conducted online among a nationally-representative sample of 1,049 renters (749 pet owners and 300 non-pet owners) and by telephone with 500 property owners and managers.

About Michelson Found Animals Foundation

Michelson Found Animals Foundation is a leading animal welfare non-profit that believes people and pets are better together. Generously funded by Dr. Gary Michelson and Alya Michelson, Found Animals operates a range of social enterprises, impact investments, strategic partnerships, and thought leadership initiatives that share a common goal: to champion pets at every point they intersect with our society. Found Animals has helped more than 5 million pets since it was founded in 2005. Learn more at foundanimals.org.

About HABRI

HABRI is a not-for-profit organization that maintains the world’s largest online library of human-animal bond research and information; funds innovative research projects to scientifically document the health benefits of companion animals; and informs the public about human-animal bond research and the beneficial role of companion animals in society. For more information, please visit habri.org.

About LRW

LRW is a globally-minded group of data-driven companies best known for its ability to translate deep human understanding and sophisticated data analytics into business success for its clients. LRW has been advising top global brands on issues of strategy, branding, communications, innovation, product development and customer experience since 1973. It is recognized as the most innovative global strategic consultancy and the most innovative insights company in North America.

Contact

Jamie Baxter

jamie@theimpetusagency.com

775.322.4022

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