Pet Partners Commits $100K in 2020 to Support Therapy Animal Research | HABRI

Pet Partners Commits $100K in 2020 to Support Therapy Animal Research

Washington, D.C. (January 6, 2020) — The Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) announced today that Pet Partners, the nation’s leading organization in animal-assisted interventions, will donate $100,000 to fund scientific research on the health, education, and wellness outcomes of therapy animals, for both the people and the animals involved. This marks the second year in a row that Pet Partners has contributed to HABRI’s research grant program, raising the total amount awarded to $200,000.

“Pet Partners therapy animal teams play a vital healing role for so many people in hospitals, nursing homes, schools, and communities,” said Annie Peters, President and CEO of Pet Partners. “Funding HABRI research will help validate the work of these dedicated volunteers and their amazing animals with scientific data, while also delivering important information that will advance best practices in the field.”

In order to be eligible for HABRI-Pet Partners funding, investigators must incorporate registered Pet Partners volunteer therapy animal teams into their proposed research. As part of the organization’s registration requirements, all Pet Partners therapy animal teams must meet high standards in the areas of patient and public safety and outstanding animal well-being.

“We are grateful for our dynamic partnership with Pet Partners and for their sustained commitment to scientific research,” said Steven Feldman, HABRI Executive Director. “Last year’s contribution funded two important research projects that we expect will produce meaningful results, and with this generous donation, we will work together to make an even bigger impact in 2020.”

In addition to funding provided by Pet Partners, researchers can apply for other HABRI grants to investigate the health and wellness outcomes of pet ownership and animal-assisted activities. Proposals should have a strong theoretical framework and take an innovative approach to assess the effect of companion animals on humans within the categories of child health and development, healthy aging, and mental and physical wellness.

This announcement is a supplement to HABRI’s 2020 Request for Proposals, open now through February 13, 2020. For more information on HABRI funding opportunities and the award application process, please visit www.habri.org/grants/funding-opportunities.

About HABRI

The Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) is a not-for-profit organization that maintains the world’s largest online library of human-animal bond research and information; funds innovative research projects to scientifically document the health benefits of companion animals; and informs the public about human-animal bond research and the beneficial role of companion animals in society. For more information about the HABRI Foundation, please visit www.habri.org.

About Pet Partners

Pet Partners is the national leader in demonstrating and promoting the health and wellness benefits of animal-assisted interventions. Since the organization’s inception in 1977, the science proving these benefits has become indisputable. With more than 13,000 registered teams making more than 3 million visits annually, Pet Partners serves as the nation’s most prestigious nonprofit registering handlers of multiple species as volunteer teams. Pet Partners teams visit with patients in recovery, people with intellectual disabilities, seniors living with Alzheimer’s, students, veterans with PTSD, and those approaching end of life, improving human health and wellbeing through the human-animal bond. With the recent release of its Standards of Practice for Animal-Assisted Interventions and international expansion, Pet Partners is globally recognized as the industry gold standard. For more information on Pet Partners, visit www.petpartners.org.

Contact

Jamie Baxter

jamie@theimpetusagency.com

775.322.4022

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