American Veterinary Distributors Association Supports Human-Animal Bond Research and Education | HABRI

American Veterinary Distributors Association Supports Human-Animal Bond Research and Education

Washington, D.C. (February 6, 2015) — The Human Animal Bond Research Initiative (HABRI) Foundation today announced that the American Veterinary Distributors Association (AVDA) has made a $5,000 donation to help gather, fund and share scientific research that demonstrates the human health benefits of pet ownership.

“The industry leading companies that form the AVDA understand the importance of the human-animal bond and how it enhances both human and animal health,” said HABRI Executive Director Steven Feldman. “The veterinary community plays a key role in the health of our communities and AVDA’s support will help deliver that message.”

“AVDA is proud to join the Human Animal Bond Research Initiative effort,” said AVDA Executive Director Jackie King. “By supporting research and education on the benefits of the human-animal bond, AVDA can help bring the health benefits of pets to more people and more families.”

The HABRI Foundation maintains the world’s largest online library of human-animal bond research and information; funds innovative research projects to scientifically document the health benefits of pets and other animals; informs the public about human-animal bond research; and advocates for public policies that support the beneficial role of pets in society.

Founded more than 35 years ago to enhance the distributor’s position in the animal health distribution channel, AVDA is committed to the success of its members by providing networking, education, and business tools to strengthen the vital link between distributors, suppliers and veterinarians. For more information on the AVDA, visit www.avda.net.

Founded by The American Pet Products Association (APPA), Petco Animal Supplies Inc., and Zoetis, the HABRI Foundation serves as a rallying point for a broad coalition of companies, organizations, and individuals who believe that our relationship with pets and animals makes the world a better place by significantly improving human health and quality of life. For more information on the HABRI Foundation, visit www.habri.org.

Contact

Brooke Gersich

brooke@theimpetusagency.com

775.322.4022

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